Pacifichem: The Increasing Influence of Openness in the Domain of Chemistry (#325)

Pacifichem 2015 will see me co-hosting two sessions at the meeting. The first one is described here,The Evolving Nature of Scholarly Communication: Connecting Scholars with Each Other and with Society“, and the second one is “The Increasing Influence of Openness in the Domain of Chemistry“.

The call for abstracts is open for BOTH sessions now until April 3rd. I believe that the majority of readers of this blog almost certainly would be interested in attending these sessions and hopefully contributing to them so please submit your abstracts soon before the deadline expires!

Outline of the Session:

Chemists are being impacted by openness every day. Open Access publishing is being encouraged by various funding agencies that support our work, we are using open source code on a daily basis, whether we know it or not, and we are increasingly accessing open data via Internet searches. The proliferation of open science is providing access to an increasing number of free and re-usable data sources for chemistry. Crowdsourcing platforms allow chemists to contribute data, annotations and assertions, including chemical compounds, reaction schema, and analytical data. Collectively these data are facilitating education, enhancing discoverability and underpinning decision making in the laboratory. Through this symposium we aim to bring together participants serving up resources for the community and engage the audience in reviewing the success, opportunities and future of open science in its various forms. The future development of science will be increasingly impacted by the open contributions and innovation and chemistry in particular is one of the scientific domains presently gaining momentum

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Pacifichem Symposium #173: The Evolving Nature of Scholarly Communication: Connecting Scholars with Each Other and with Society

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS IS OPEN

Pacifichem #173 graphic REV 4

Scholarly journal publishing is now web based and web first, but this migration to the Internet has brought with it other changes as well. Scientists are now collaborating with each other globally in ways that would not have been possible even ten years ago. Some researchers are using social media, such as blogs and twitter, to comment on and recommend articles, and in so doing establish a reputation beyond journal article publication and citation. Some scientists are posting research results directly to the Internet, where other scientists can analyze the data and discuss its meaning. Tools and algorithms to deliver the right content to the right person help researchers navigate the ever increasing amount of scholarly content.

At the same time, both scientists and funding agencies are interested in the broader impact of their research on society. A growing contingent of scientists and science communicators from academia, government, and industry are utilizing social media tools and platforms to communicate their chemistry beyond the traditional audience. This mechanism of science communication can potentially lead to benefits to society in the form of identifying and building new and existing business relationships, helping to resolve some of the challenges of the digital classroom, and expand the science communication channels formerly limited to onsite participation at Universities or scientific conferences. Examples include use of YouTube, blogs, Twitter, Wikipedia, and scientific apps.

This symposium will examine how traditional publishing models are changing as a result of the impact of social media, as well as how social media are being used to foster new models of communication and engagement with society.

We welcome contributions that examine ways in which researchers are engaging in new communication models, as well as ways in which journals and publishers are responding to these new models.

Contact us:

Corresponding Organizer: Jennifer Maclachlan, PID Analyzers, LLC (USA), pidgirl@gmail.com @pidgirl
Brenna Arlyce Brown, Mitacs, (Canada), brennab@ualberta.ca @BrennaArlyce
Kazuhiro Hayashi, NISTEP (Japan), khayashi@nistep.go.jp
David Martinsen, ACS (USA), d_martinsen@acs.org
Antony Williams, RSC (USA), tony27587@gmail.com @chemconnector

 

Abstract submissions will be accepted from January 1 – April 3, 2015 at http://www.pacifichem.org.

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My Royal Society of Chemistry Articles in the Kudos Dashboard

I publish with a lot of publishers including RSC, ACS, Wiley, Springer, Elsevier etc. as evidenced by the list on my CV. However, as I conduct more work on Kudos to play with the platform I am happy to say that RSC has a rather unique position in terms of how we are displayed. I know we are not the only ones with the cover art (as I recall)

As an example, for the RSC MedChemComm article here: https://www.growkudos.com/articles/10.1039/c0md00129e you see the cover art displayed which I believe is a nice touch.

Kudos_RSC_Cover

Also, and this I REALLY like, I can see the number of full text downloads. For the article below the number 550 is the number of full text downloads.

kudos_text_downloads

For completeness the last five columns are:

Share referrals Kudos views Click throughs Full text downloads Altmetric score

I am increasingly using Kudos as a one-stop shop dashboard to review activities around my articles so to be able to compare ACROSS publishers what the full text downloads are is of value. I should think it should be possible to include views from the publisher website also. While our PLoS article here has had 47 Saves it is about to hit 11,000 views. THAT I would like to see in the table also.

In any case …I am glad to see that we at RSC are contributing the data so I can see it in the Kudos dashboard….now, will other publishers be sharing their data soon too?

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Can I use Social Networking Tools to Awaken Old Articles?

I am running a number of experiments right now on behalf of my friend and colleague Will Russell to see what ammunition I can give him for a presentation later this week. I am already running the experiment detailed here “Running an Experiment Regarding Growing AltMetrics Using Kudos” and the data is clear…it’s working. But what I think is working is that I am simply claiming articles on Kudos, enriching them as appropriate and I am doing the work to push the info out to the social networks…sharing it via email, Facebook and Twitter. I ran some bland tweets and facebook posts about some articles and got the expected resulted..low altmetric scores. I got a little creative about our article on Fuzzy Structure Generation and some quips about pulling my hair out over the science etc. and boom Altmetrics score went up dramatically. I am about to spike it again I hope with another tweet. This is simply pushing up the Altmetric score with NO INDICATION that anyone read the article, cared about the science, or even looked at it. So this does beg the question whether or not an increase in the Altmetric score means anything but this is a different conversation and one that has happened many times. This experiment is simply showing how important my own involvement is is shifting things along…well that’s my interpretation at least.

Now what I want to do is to NOT use Kudos to push out the social networking posts etc but simply do the work away from the platform and see whether the Altmetric score grows, and how fast can I move it. I have a whole set of articles regarding Electron Paramagnetic Resonance that are hard to make exciting. But the one on eight carbon alkyl chains and molecular motions is a good one so I have chosen that one to shift. Notice LOW kudos views and no Altmetric score…last column.

 

Altmetrics_expt2_part1

It’s from 1990 and, from my point of view, this was MY breakthrough work in my thesis…I was able to learn a lot about what it means to be a scientist, to develop a hypothesis and analyze data. I am very proud of this work….

May the experiment begin….

 

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Name disambiguation, ORCIDs and author IDs for Science Books

Those of you who follow my blog will know that I am a fan of ORCIDs and it is great to hear that there are now over a MILLION ORCIDS issued! The sooner the better as far as I am concerned that I can start claiming all of my books and book chapters against MY ORCID and then moving that information to other platforms. My Amazon Author Page is here: http://www.amazon.com/Antony-J.-Williams/e/B004YRPRV2 and I am glad to say that despite the fact that there is a book called “I Hate Sex” with the author Antony J. Williams, exactly the spelling of my name, is NOT associated with me. Phew…

If we could start to make sure, somehow, that ORCIDs, or at least some form of AUTHOR IDs were utilized by all publishers and associated with books that are published (and listed on Amazon and Google Books) then maybe we wouldn’t have this problem listed below….

My GREAT FRIEND Gary Martin (and often times mentor in NMR) and I are editing a two volume series with David Rovnyak. Volume 1 is listed on Amazon here and Volume 2 is here. Now then…Gary is rather well known in the world of NMR….his Wikipedia page is here. On Amazon his skill set is listed as under “About the Author” as:

“Gary E. Martin graduated with a B.S. in Pharmacy in 1972 from the University of Pittsburgh and a Ph.D. in Pharmaceutical Sciences from the University of Kentucky in 1975, specializing in NMR spectroscopy. He was a Professor at the University of Houston from 1975 to 1989, assuming the position of Section Head responsible for US NMR spectroscopy at Burroughs Wellcome, Co. in Research Triangle Park, NC, eventually being promoted to the level of Principal Scientist. In 1996 he assumed a position at what was initially the Upjohn Company in Kalamazoo, MI and held several positions there through 2006 by which time he was a Senior Fellow at what was then Pfizer, Inc. In 2006 he assumed a position as a Distinguished Fellow at Schering-Plough responsible for the creation of the Rapid Structure Characterization Laboratory. He is presently a Distinguished Fellow at Merck Research Laboratories.”

So HOW interesting to see who Google Books thinks he is! See the link here… it reads as

“Gary Martin’s career as a freelance comic book artist spans over twenty years. He’s worked for all the major companies, including Marvel, DC, Dark Horse, Image, and Disney, and on such titles as, Spider-man, X-men, Batman, Star Wars, and Mickey Mouse. Gary is best known for his popular how-to books entitled, ‘The Art of Comic Book Inking’. Recently, Gary wrote a comic book series called ‘The Moth’, which he co-created with artist Steve Rude.”

I am not listed as an editor and for sure the information is out of date since David Rovnyak joined as an editor this year.

googlebooks

This is Gary Martin, the inker.

So…I am very interested in any hypotheses regarding how Google Books picked up a comic inker as an author when Amazon lists Gary as a scientist, clearly. By the way, Gary Martin, NMR spectroscopist extraordinaire is a brilliant photographer, especially of lighthouses…but manipulates light…not ink.

Imagine, if you would, the potential power of ORCIDs in keeping this clear, platform to platform, if the publisher used them, if Amazon adopted them and if Google Books used the data. With time…

 

 

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Running an Experiment Regarding Growing AltMetrics Using Kudos

I want to run a simple experiment using the Kudos platform. I want to see how much activity I can push in terms of AltMetrics scores via the Kudos platform. I have selected a series of articles, each with no altmetric scores and will be kudos’ing the articles over the next few days and watching for results. The selection of articles is below and as you can see…no altmetric scores and fairly low views via Kudos.

Kudos No Altmetrics

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A presentation at Research Square: The Benefits of Participation in the Social Web of Science

Yesterday I had the privilege of giving a presentation at Research Square in Durham. In terms of an audience, and an environment to present, it was certainly an ideal environment and very recipient audience….but how could it not be with their mission being to provide “research communication without roadblocks”. As the MC for the day commented about when she joined Research Square “I thought “I’d found my peeps””. So many of the conversations over lunch were about commonality of views..and it appears…our networks are so similar….yup, definitely my type of peeps. :-)

If you don’t think you know Research Square then maybe you know some of their brands? Rubriq, Journal Guide and American Journal Experts.

The Benefits of Participation in the Social Web of Science

With the flourishing environment of platforms for sharing data, establishing an online profile and engaging in scientific discourse through alternative modes of publishing and participation, there are numerous potential benefits. However, while many scientists invest significant amounts of time in sharing their activities and opinions with friends and family the majority do not make use of the new opportunities to participate in the developing social web of science, despite the potential impact and influence on future careers. We now have many new ways to contribute to science outside of the classical publishing model. These include the ability to annotate and curate data, to “publish” in new ways on blogs and micropublishing sites, and many of these activities can be as part of a growing crowdsourcing network. Our efforts in this area are already being indexed and exposed on the internet via our publications, presentations and data and increasingly we are being quantified. This presentation will provide an overview of the various types of networking and collaborative sites available to scientists and ways to expose their scientific activities online. Many of these can ultimately contribute to the developing metrics of a scientist as identified in the new world of alternative metrics. Participation offers a great opportunity to develop a scientific profile within the community and may ultimately be very beneficial, especially to scientists early in their career.

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The Application of Text and Data Mining to Enhance the Royal Society of Chemistry Publication Archive

I just found the video of my presentation given at the 2014 Emerging Trends in Scholarly Publishing™ Seminar

The Application of Text and Data Mining to Enhance the Royal Society of Chemistry Publication Archive

The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) is one of the world’s most prominent scientific societies and STM publishers. Our contributions to the scientific community include the delivery of a myriad of resources to support the chemistry community to access chemistry-related data, information and knowledge. This includes ChemSpider, a compound centric platform linking together over 30 million chemical compounds with internet-based resources. Using this compound database and its associated chemical identifiers as a basis the RSC is utilizing text and data mining approaches to data enable our published archive of scientific publications. This presentation will provide an overview of our technical approaches to text and data enable our archive of scientific articles, how we are developing an integrated database of chemical compounds, reactions, physical and analytical data and how it will be used to facilitate scientific discovery.

Both the SLideshare presentation and my presentation are posted below:

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A chemistry data repository to serve them all

A presentation that I am giving around UK universities in September/October 2014

A chemistry data repository to serve them all

Over the past five years the Royal Society of Chemistry has become world renowned for its public domain compound database that integrates chemical structures with online resources and available data. ChemSpider regularly serves over 50,000 users per day who are seeking chemistry related data. In parallel we have used ChemSpider and available software services to underpin a number of grant-based projects that we have been involved with: Open PHACTS – a semantic web project integrating chemistry and biology data, PharmaSea – seeking out new natural products from the ocean and the National Chemical Database Service for the United Kingdom. We are presently developing a new architecture that will offer broader scope in terms of the types of chemistry data that can be hosted. This presentation will provide an overview of our Cheminformatics activities at RSC, the development of a new architecture for a data repository that will underpin a global chemistry network, and the challenges ahead, as well as our activities in releasing software and data to the chemistry community.

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Beyond the paper CV and developing a scientific profile through social media, AltMetrics and micropublication

This is a presentation that I gave during a UK tour in Sept/Oct 2014 at a number of UK universities

Beyond the paper CV and developing a scientific profile through social media, AltMetrics and micropublications

Many of us nowadays invest significant amounts of time in sharing our activities and opinions with friends and family via social networking tools. However, despite the availability of many platforms for scientists to connect and share with their peers in the scientific community the majority do not make use of these tools, despite their promise and potential impact and influence on our future careers. We are being indexed and exposed on the internet via our publications, presentations and data. We also have many more ways to contribute to science, to annotate and curate data, to “publish” in new ways, and many of these activities are as part of a growing crowdsourcing network. This presentation will provide an overview of the various types of networking and collaborative sites available to scientists and ways to expose your scientific activities online. Many of these can ultimately contribute to the developing measures of you as a scientist as identified in the new world of alternative metrics. Participating offers a great opportunity to develop a scientific profile within the community and may ultimately be very beneficial, especially to scientists early in their career.

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