Archive for category AltMetrics

Online networking, data sharing and research activity distribution tools for scientists

This is just a short post, and I need to write more when I have time, about the result of a writing collaboration with Lou Peck and Sean Ekins on an article entitled “The new alchemy: Online networking, data sharing and research activity distribution tools for scientists” (http://dx.doi.org/10.12688/f1000research.12185.1). This took a LONG time to get published, and morphed from the original concept, but there appears to be a lot of interest judging by the views and downloads stats in the first few days (775 views and 20% of this number as downloads). That’s a good conversion rate. It’s open for PUBLIC COMMENTS and we welcome your feedback.

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How Poor Altmetrics are for my old articles…

In preparation for a talk later this week I have been investigating adding Altmetric and Plum analytics scores into my online CV as we as Kudos Resources. I would expect that Altmetric scores would be VERY low for old articles as they were published way before the social networking tools existed. However, the Plum Widget should be useful in terms of showing citations, views and downloads etc. The Kudos resources will be meaningful since I have been working SLOWLY through my articles with the latest first.

I think the Altmetric scores shown below bears out my opinion since MOST don’t have any score whatsoever. However, this blog post should lift a number of them over the next few days.


ARTICLES

1989
1. F.L. Lee, K.F. Preston, A.J. Williams, L.H. Sutcliffe, A.J. Banister, S.T. Wait, A single-crystal electron paramagnetic resonance study of the 4-phenyl-1,2,3,5-dithiadiazolyl radical   Magn. Reson. Chem. 27, 1161-1165 (1989). Link
AltMetrics Analytics

PLUMX Analytics

Kudos Resources

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1990
2. D.G. Gillies, S.J. Matthews, L.H. Sutcliffe and A.J. Williams, The Evaluation of Two Correlation Times for Methyl Groups from Carbon-13 Spin-lattice Relaxation Times and nOe Data  J. Magn. Reson., 86, 371 (1990) Link
AltMetrics Analytics

PLUMX Analytics

Kudos Resources

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3. P.J. Bratt, D.G. Gillies, L.H. Sutcliffe and A.J. Williams, NMR Relaxation Studies of Internal Motions – A Comparison between Micelles and Related Systems, J. Phys. Chem., 94(7), 2727 (1990) Link
AltMetrics Analytics

PLUMX Analytics

Kudos Resources

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4. R.C. Hynes, J.R. Morton, J.A. Hriljac, Y. LePage, K.F. Preston, A.J. Williams, F. Evans, M.C. Grossel and L.H. Sutcliffe,  Isolated Free Radical Pairs in Rb+TCNQ- 18-crown-6 Single Crystals, J.Chem. Soc.,Chem. Commun., 5, 439 (1990) Link
AltMetrics Analytics

PLUMX Analytics

Kudos Resources

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5. P.J. Krusic, J.R. Morton, K.F. Preston, A.J. Williams and F. Lee, EPR Spectrum of the Fe2(CO)8- Radical Trapped in Single Crystals of PPN+HFe2(CO)8- , Organometallics 9, 697 (1990). Link
AltMetrics Analytics

PLUMX Analytics

Kudos Resources

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6. R. Hynes, K.F. Preston, J.J. Springs, and A.J. Williams, Single-crystal EPR Study of Radical Pairs in [Fe(mesitylene)22+] {C3[C(CN)2]3-}2, J. Chem. Phys. 93(4), 2222, 1990 Link
AltMetrics Analytics

PLUMX Analytics

Kudos Resources

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7. R. Hynes, K.F. Preston, J.J. Springs, and A.J. Williams, EPR Studies of Radical Pairs [M(CO)5]2 (M = Cr, Mo, W) Trapped in Single Crystals of PPN+ HM(CO)5-, Organometallics, 9, 2298 (1990) Link
AltMetrics Analytics

PLUMX Analytics

Kudos Resources

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8. R. Hynes, K.F. Preston, J.J. Springs, and A.J. Williams, Electron paramagnetic resonance study of the tetracarbonyl(trimethylphosphite)tungstate(1-) radical anion trapped in a single crystal of [N(PPh3)2][W(CO)4H{P(OMe)3}], Journal of the Chemical Society, Dalton Transactions:  Inorganic Chemistry (1972-1999)  12, 3655-61(1990) Link
AltMetrics Analytics

PLUMX Analytics

Kudos Resources

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1991
9. R. Hynes, K.F. Preston, J.J. Springs, J. Tse and A.J. Williams, EPR Studies of M(CO)5-  Radicals (M = Cr, Mo, W) Trapped in Single Crystals of PPh4+ HM(CO)5- , J. Chem. Soc. Faraday Trans., 87(19), 3121 (1991) Link
AltMetrics Analytics

PLUMX Analytics

Kudos Resources

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10. R.C. Hynes, J.R. Morton, K.F. Preston, A.J. Williams, F. Evans, M.C. Grossel, L.H. Sutcliffe, and S.C. Weston, An EPR Study of Isolated Free Radical Pairs in M+ 18-Crown-6 TCNQ-  salts (TCNQ:7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane; M=K, Rb), J. Chem. Soc. Faraday Trans., 87(14), 2229 (1991) Link
AltMetrics Analytics

PLUMX Analytics

Kudos Resources

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To show what it looked like when I posted this blog entry the attached image shows a small number of the articles with zero scores.

altmetric scores

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Add Altmetric and PlumX scores and Kudos Resources to your online CV

Over the weekend I spent a little time working to integrate Altmetric and PlumX scores to my online CV here on my blog. I also integrated my Kudos resources associated with an article directly into the CV.it’s a breeze and requires only that you have DOIs for your article. See below for how ONE article in my CV is represented.

154. Programmatic Conversion of Crystal Structures into 3D Printable Files, V.F. Scalfani, <strong>A.J. Williams</strong>, V. Tkachenko, K. Karapetyan, A. Pshenichnov, R.M. Hanson, J.M. Liddie and J.E. Bara, Journal of Cheminformatics, 2016, 8:66 Article Type: Methodology <a href=”http://jcheminf.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s13321-016-0181-z”><strong>Link</strong> </a>
<strong>AltMetrics Analytics</strong>
<div class=”altmetric-embed” data-badge-type=”medium-donut” data-badge-details=”right” data-doi=”10.1186/s13321-016-0181-z“></div>
<strong>PLUMX Analytics</strong>
<a href=’https://plu.mx/plum/a?doi=10.1186/s13321-016-0181-z‘ class=’plumx-plum-print-popup’></a>
<strong>Kudos Resources</strong>
<script src=”//api.growkudos.com/widgets/resources/10.1186/s13321-016-0181-z“></script>

Literally all you have to do is copy these few lines and swap out the DOI and the scores and Kudos resources will show up in your CV. Simple.

Altmetric, PlumX and Kudos Embedded widgets

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Why Have I Pushed so Much Traffic To Twitter This Weekend? GAMING or SAVVY?

Next Tuesday, November 29th, I am leading a two hour workshop as described here:

The NC-ACS together with RTI International is excited to provide dinner and a workshop titled “Building an Online Profile Using Social Networking and Amplification Tools for Scientists”!

DATE AND TIME: Tue, November 29, 2016, 6:00 PM – 9:00 PM EST

LOCATION: The Frontier, 800 Park Offices Drive, Triangle, NC 27709

The event includes dinner from The Farmery starting at 6PM! The workshop will begin promptly at 6:30PM.

Please note to bring your computer and let our Speaker, Antony Williams, help you build your online profile!

Space is limited!  Please register here: https://ncacssocialnetworking.eventbrite.com

In advance of that gathering I was fortunate to have two papers published last week and I wanted to show how I could use Social Media to drive attention, views, downloads and altmetrics to those papers. They are:

Programmatic conversion of crystal structures into 3D printable files using Jmol at http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13321-016-0181-z

and

An automated curation procedure for addressing chemical errors and inconsistencies in public datasets used in QSAR modelling at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1062936x.2016.1253611

I started pushing the 3D printing article out on Friday morning and noticed a surge in attention early in the day and it continued throughout the day. I kept attention going throughout the weekend and saw less attention and while it is possible that I saturated my network of connections I think what is more likely is people are simply away from their computers at the weekend and Twitter will get less attention from the overall network. That’s my hypothesis, yet to be proven. It SHOULD be noted that the initial surge in AltMetrics came from the publisher themselves when they pushed it out for us as authors. See https://twitter.com/jcheminf/status/802078618629373952. I suggest making sure your PUBLISHER is pushing out your article via Twitter as part of their service. And BOOK PUBLISHERS should be using Twitter in the same way.

For the automated curation procedure for data curation and QSAR modeling paper I FOUND that on Friday night about midnight….as I kept checking back to see when it was finally published. (Emails to authors would be a good idea don’t you think?). I pushed that out after midnight on Friday and the attention, and corresponding AltMetrics are way less than for the 3D article. Maybe it’s because the article is less interesting (but I don’t agree with that for my network). Maybe, and more likely I think, is Friday night release and throughout Saturday has less overall Twitter attention (see original hypothesis). But it could be I simply saturated the network with my first 3D printing posting. It’s not possible to tease this out with this one experiment so there will be others. Maybe the study has already been done???

In any case the 3D printing one has good altmetric scores now (40 as of 12:50pm on Sunday) and the QSAR modeling paper is lagging (a score of 4). I think a big contribution to the lagging altmetrics for the QSAR modeling paper is the fact that SAR and QSAR in Environmental Research from Taylor and Francis may not have much of a following and may not tweet out the article directly (the last comments I saw about SAR and QSAR on Twitter were mostly in 2013) . One other MAJOR contributing factor may be that JChemInf is FULLY Open Access and our 3D article is fully Open. The SAR and QSAR article in Taylor and Francis has an Open Access option and we didn’t use it, yet. Again, just hypotheses.

Thanks to @JChemInf for doing their job well re. pushing it out to Twitter.I think it helped….

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Social Media Tools for Scientists and Building an Online Profile

This presentation will be given at the Janelia Farm Research Campus, a research campus of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. The presentation abstract is below.

ABSTRACT
Despite the availability of many platforms for scientists to connect and share with their peers in the scientific community the majority do not make use of these tools, despite their promise and potential impact and influence on our careers. We are already being indexed and exposed on the internet via our publications, presentations and data and new “AltMetric scores” are being assigned to scientific publications as measures of popularity and, supposedly, of impact. We now have even more ways to contribute to science, to annotate and curate data, to “publish” in new ways, and many of these activities are as part of a growing crowdsourcing network. This presentation provides an overview of the various types of networking and collaborative sites available to scientists and ways to expose your scientific activities online. It will discuss the new world of AltMetrics that is in an explosive growth curve and will help you understand how to influence and leverage some of these new measures. Participating online, whether it be simply for career advancement or for wider exposure of your research, there are now a series of web applications that can provide a great opportunity to develop a scientific profile within the community.

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The confusing world of Altmetrics – A personal opinion, with confusing data

I am a fan of Altmetrics. At least in concept. But I starting to get very concerned with both the tools used to measure them and what the “numbers” are expected to indicate. We would expect that a high “number” in an Altmetric.com “donut” would be indicative, in some way, of the relative importance or “impact” of that article. One would hope it at least points to how well read the article is, whether the readers like the science and the potential for the article to, for example, move forward understanding or proliferate data into further usage. I am not sure this is true…at least for some of the articles I am involved with.

Let’s take for example the recent Zika Virus article that Sean Ekins led. The F1000 site gives us some stats in regards to Views and Downloads and the Metrics shows the Altmetric stats. I would assume that 48 DOWNLOADers would have at least some of them reading the article. Some of the VIEWers are likely to have read it and maybe printed it. For the Altmetric stats the 33 tweets are likely people pointing to the article and because of the way I use Twitter I am going to suggest that Tweets are less indicative of the number of readers of the article. There is a definition on the Altmetric site regarding how Twitter stats are compiled.

Metrics on the F1000 Zika Article Page

If we use the Altmetric Bookmarklet we can navigate to the page with a score

Altmetric page with score

The score of “41” is essentially the sum of bloggers, tweets, Facebook posts etc. summarized below (1+1+1+33+1+3+1 for being on Altmetric.com???)

Sum all networking posts to get 41

When I asked F1000Research via Twitter why they don’t show the “number” I appreciated their answer. I AGREE with their sentiment.

F1000 feedback on Twitter

 

Yesterday I received an email about our Journal of Cheminformatics article “Ambiguity of non-systematic chemical identifiers within and between small-molecule databases“, part of which is shown below.

Journal of Cheminformatics email

On the actual Journal of Cheminformatics page it says there have been 1444 accesses (not 2216 as cited in the email).

Journal of Cheminformatics Accesses

Also the Altmetric score is 8. So somewhere between 1400-2200 accesses (and it is safe to assume some proportion actual read it!). But it has a low Altmetric score of 8. This is versus an Altmetric score of >40 for the Zika Virus paper and a lot less accesses and probably a lot of the altmetrics for that article don’t necessarily indicate reads of the article as they are Tweets, many of them from the authors out to the world.

Using PlumX I am extremely disappointed regarding what it reflects about the JChemInf article! Only 10 HTML Views versus the 1400-2200 accesses reported above, and only 7 readers and 1 save! UGH. But 13 Tweets are noted so it seems so I would expect at least an Altmetric.com score of 13 or 14, instead of the 8 marked on the article?

PlumX stats

I also tried to sign into ImpactStory to check stats but got a “Uh oh, looks like we’ve got a system error…feel free to let us know, and we’ll fix it.” message so will report back on that.

Altmetrics should be maturing now to a point where the metrics of reads, accesses, downloads should be fed into some overall metric. I think that reads/accesses/downloads should carry more weight than a Tweet in terms of impact of an article? At least if someone read it, whether they agree with it or not they are MORE aware of the content than if someone simply shared the link to an article, that then didn’t get read? The platforms themselves are so desync’ed in terms of the various numbers themselves that we must wonder how are things so badly broken? I would imagine that stats gathered in someway through CrossRef or ORCID will ultimately help this to mature but until then treat them all with a level of suspicion. I believe that AltMetrics will be an important part of helping to define impact for an article. But there is still a long way to go I’m afraid….

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NCSU Presentation: Data integration and building a profile for yourself as an online scientist

This is a presentation I gave at North Carolina State University hosted by Denis Fourches.

Data integration and building a profile for yourself as an online scientist

Many of us nowadays invest significant amounts of time in sharing our activities and opinions with friends and family via social networking tools. However, despite the availability of many platforms for scientists to connect and share with their peers in the scientific community the majority do not make use of these tools, despite their promise and potential impact and influence on our future careers. We are being indexed and exposed on the internet via our publications, presentations and data. We also have many more ways to contribute to science, to annotate and curate data, to “publish” in new ways, and many of these activities are as part of a growing crowdsourcing network. This presentation will provide an overview of the various types of networking and collaborative sites available to scientists and ways to expose your scientific activities online. Many of these can ultimately contribute to the developing measures of you as a scientist as identified in the new world of alternative metrics. Participating offers a great opportunity to develop a scientific profile within the community and may ultimately be very beneficial, especially to scientists early in their career.

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Our dire need to mandate data standards and expectations for scientific publishing

This is a presentation that I delivered at the ACS Division of Chemical Information meeting regarding “Reproducibility, Reporting, Sharing & Plagiarism” at ACS Denver on 23rd March 2015.

I took the opportunity to remove my hat that has me be the VP of Strategic Development at RSC, and a member of the cheminformatics group that built ChemSpider and works on other RSC projects related to it. Instead I presented on how a LACK OF MANDATES from publishers on me in terms of submission of data accompanying articles I am involved with writing is actually weakening my scientific record as data is not getting shared in the most useful forms possible to the benefit of the community. I think there would be benefits for publishers to start pushing me for MORE data, in fairly general standards, and allowing me (and others) to download the data in the form of molecules (and collections), spectral data, CSV files etc.

 

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Providing Access to a Million NMR Spectra via the web

This presentation was given at the ACS Denver meeting on March 22nd 2015 in a CHED Division symposium

Providing Access to a Million NMR Spectra via the web

Antony Williams, Alexey Pshenichnov, Peter Corbett, Daniel Lowe, Carlos Coba

Access to large scale NMR collections of spectral data can be used for a number of purposes in terms of teaching spectroscopy to students. The data can be used for teaching purposes in lectures, as training data sets for spectral interpretation and structure elucidation, and to underpin educational resources such as the Royal Society of Chemistry’s Learn Chemistry. These resources have been available for a number of years but have been limited to rather small collections of spectral data and specifically only about 3000 spectra. In order to expand the data collection and provide richer resources for the community we have been gathering data from various laboratories and, as part of a research project, we have used text-mining approaches to extract spectral data from articles and patents in the form of textual strings and utilized algorithms to convert the data into spectral representations. While these spectra are reconstructions of text representations of the original spectral data we are investigating their value in terms of utilizing for the purpose of structure identification. This presentation will report on the processes of extracting structure-spectral pairs from text, approaches to performing automated spectral verification and our intention to assemble a spectral collection of a million NMR spectra and make them available online.

 

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Give me kudos for taking responsibility for self-marketing my scientific publications and increase impact

This presentation was given at the ACS Denver meeting on March 22nd 2015 in a CINF Division symposium

Give me kudos for taking responsibility for self-marketing my scientific publications and increase impact.

Antony Williams, Will Russell, Melinda Kenneway and Louise Peck

The authoring of a scientific publication can represent the culmination of many tens if not 100s of hours of data collection and analysis. The authoring and peer-review process itself often represents a major undertaking in terms of assembling the publication and passing through review. Considering the amount of work invested in the production of a scientific article it is therefore quite surprising that authors, post-publication, invest very little effort in communicating the value and potential impact of their article to the community. Social networking has clearly demonstrated the ability to self-market and drive attention. At the same time, the increasing volume of literature (over a million new articles are published every year), requires authors to take on a more direct role in ensuring their work gets read and cited. This requirement may grow with the emergence of a range of metrics at the article level, shifting attention away from where a researcher publishes to the performance of their individual articles. Therefore, a separate platform to facilitate social networking and other discovery tools to communicate the value of published science to the community would be of value. In parallel the possibility to enhance an article by linking to additional information (presentations, videos, blog posts etc) allows for enrichment of the article post-publication, a capability not available via the publishers platform. This presentation will provide a personal overview of the experiences of using the Kudos Platform and how it ultimately benefits my ability to communicate an integrated view of my research to the community.

 

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