Archive for category ImpactStory

Social Media Tools for Scientists and Building an Online Profile

This presentation will be given at the Janelia Farm Research Campus, a research campus of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. The presentation abstract is below.

ABSTRACT
Despite the availability of many platforms for scientists to connect and share with their peers in the scientific community the majority do not make use of these tools, despite their promise and potential impact and influence on our careers. We are already being indexed and exposed on the internet via our publications, presentations and data and new “AltMetric scores” are being assigned to scientific publications as measures of popularity and, supposedly, of impact. We now have even more ways to contribute to science, to annotate and curate data, to “publish” in new ways, and many of these activities are as part of a growing crowdsourcing network. This presentation provides an overview of the various types of networking and collaborative sites available to scientists and ways to expose your scientific activities online. It will discuss the new world of AltMetrics that is in an explosive growth curve and will help you understand how to influence and leverage some of these new measures. Participating online, whether it be simply for career advancement or for wider exposure of your research, there are now a series of web applications that can provide a great opportunity to develop a scientific profile within the community.

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Dealing with the Complex Challenge of Managing Diverse Chemistry Data Online to Enable Chemistry Across the World #ACSsanfran

This is my third presentation today at the ACS meeting in San Francisco on 11th August 2014

Dealing with the Complex Challenge of Managing Diverse Chemistry Data Online to Enable Chemistry Across the World

The Royal Society of Chemistry has provided access to data associated with millions of chemical compounds via our ChemSpider database for over 5 years. During this period the richness and complexity of the data has continued to expand dramatically and the original vision for providing an integrated hub for structure-centric data has been delivered across the world to hundreds of thousands of users. With an intention of expanding the reach to cover more diverse aspects of chemistry-related data including compounds, reactions and analytical data, to name just a few data-types, we are in the process of implementing a new architecture to build a Chemistry Data Repository. The data repository will manage the challenges of associated metadata, the various levels of required security (private, shared and public) and exposing the data as appropriate using semantic web technologies. Ultimately this platform will become the host for all chemicals, reactions and analytical data contained within RSC publications and specifically supplementary information. This presentation will report on how our efforts to manage chemistry related data has impacted chemists and projects across the world and will review specifically our contributions to projects involving natural products for collaborators in Brazil and China, for the Open Source Drug Discovery project in India, and our collaborations with scientists in Russia.

 

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Encouraging students to start publishing early in their career #ACSsanfran

My second talk of three on August 11th 2014 at the ACS Meeting in San Francisco.

Encouraging students to start publishing early in their career

Many students spend enormous amounts of their time engaged with their computers, accepting of course that mobile devices are simply computers of a different form factor. Engaged with the social networks, utilizing computer platforms to source and share content of various forms, their contributions of “data” into what is the cloud, and in many cases a void, is enormous. What community and career benefit might result from those students spending some of their time contributing chemistry related data to the world? What challenges lie in the way of their participation and how might participating have a positive, or negative impact on their future career. The Royal Society of Chemistry hosts a number of chemistry data platforms to which students can actively contribute and for which their participation can be measured. Moreover the RSC’s micropublishing platform allows chemists to learn how to write up their scientific work, obtain review from their peers and chemistry professors in a non-threatening environment and produce an online published work in less than day that is both citable and available as a shared resource for the community. This presentation will demonstrate how to participate and encourage engagement from students early in their education. There are no longer any technology barriers to the sharing of the majority of chemistry related data.

 

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Choosing Between Slideshare or Figshare to Share my Presentations

I give a lot of presentations. A lot. Maybe too many. At the impending ACS meeting in San Francisco I am giving nine presentations. When I give a presentation I like to share it afterwards. I need the distribution method to be quick, easy to use and hopefully let users of the platform find it if they were interested in it. I have used various platforms to disseminate my talks. There are really no usability issues with any of them….the various groups have done a good job building their platforms. I am a user of both Slideshare and Figshare and my accounts are here: Slideshare and Figshare. This week I received my weekly stats email and the numbers are below…>3000 views in one week and a total of 400,000 views total of my talks, preprints etc.

My Slideshare Stats Delivered by Email

Compare this with my Figshare stats of >6600 views ever.

My total Figshare Stats

The majority of talks I upload to Slideshare have about 3000 views in 2 months as shown below…some have over 25000 now.

>3000 downloads in 2 months on Slideshare

If I compare this with Figshare the most views I have is around 500 but that was over 18 months.

Top viewed presentations on Figshare

Clearly my presentations on Slideshare get way higher exposure. However, the usual question of quality vs quantity comes to bear. Likely the audience on Figshare, of scientists primarily, may be more my audience rather on Slideshare. What I should do, but it is time-consuming (but only a few additional minutes per presentation) is put the presentation to Slideshare, to Figshare, to my Academia.edu account, to my ResearchGate account, to Vimeo, to YouTube etc. But I only have so much time and right now my easiest deposition route is Slideshare. In terms of my actual prioritization of places to deposit, based on the number of views and downloads the order is

Slideshare>ResearchGate>Academia.edu>Figshare

I specifically like the fact that Slideshare is picked up by ImpactStory. impactstory4

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Beyond the paper CV and developing a scientific profile through social media, altmetrics and micropublication

This is a presentation that I will have delivered twice here in the UK this week…

Beyond the paper CV and developing a scientific profile through social media, altmetrics and micropublication

Many of us nowadays invest significant amounts of time in sharing our activities and opinions with friends and family via social networking tools. However, despite the availability of many platforms for scientists to connect and share with their peers in the scientific community the majority do not make use of these tools, despite their promise and potential impact and influence on our future careers. We are being indexed and exposed on the internet via our publications, presentations and data. We also have many more ways to contribute to science, to annotate and curate data, to “publish” in new ways, and many of these activities are as part of a growing crowdsourcing network. This presentation will provide an overview of the various types of networking and collaborative sites available to scientists and ways to expose your scientific activities online. Many of these can ultimately contribute to the developing measures of you as a scientist as identified in the new world of alternative metrics. Participating offers a great opportunity to develop a scientific profile within the community and may ultimately be very beneficial, especially to scientists early in their career.

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The potential benefits of making yourself visible online as a scientist

The potential benefits of making yourself visible online as a scientist

This is a presentation I gave at MIT to the Boston ACS Young Chemists regarding how they can take advantage of some of the online tools to spread the message about their activities, their interests, get engaged with collaborative science and participate now to gain benefits from the growing world of AltMetrics

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The future of scientific information & communication presented at the SUNY Potsdam Academic Festival

This is a LONG presentation….I talk about the “It’s All About Me” attitude that can positively feed science….we want to share OUR science, we want people to know about our opinions, our activities, our collaborators, we want to get funding, recognition and attribution. And why not…it can all be to the benefit of science.

This presentation was given at the SUNY Potsdam Academic Festival

The future of scientific information & communication

Our access to scientific information has changed in ways that were hardly imagined even by the early pioneers of the internet. The immense quantities of data and the array of tools available to search and analyze online content continues to expand while the pace of change does not appear to be slowing. While scientists now have access to the enormous capacities and capability of the internet the vast majority of scientific communication continues to be through peer-reviewed scientific journals. The measure of a scientist’s contribution is primarily represented by their publication profile and the citations to their published works and offers an incomplete view of their activities. However, we are at the beginning of a new revolution where the ability to communicate offers the opportunity to embrace new forms of publishing and where scientific participation and influence will be measured in new ways. This presentation will provide an overview of our new generation of “openness” in which open source, open standards, open access and open data are proliferating. The future of scientific information and communication will be underpinned by these efforts, influenced by increasing participation from the scientific community and facilitated collaboration and ultimately accelerate scientific progress.

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Navigating scientific resources using wiki based resources

Presentation given at ACS New Orleans Spring Meeting

There is an overwhelming number of new resources for chemistry that would likely benefit both librarians and students in terms of improving access to data and information. While commercial solutions provided by an institution may be the primary resources there is now an enormous range of online tools, databases, resources, apps for mobile devices and, increasingly, wikis. This presentation will provide an overview of how wiki-based resources for scientists are developing and will introduce a number of developing wikis. These include wikis that are being used to teach chemistry to students as well as to source information about scientists, scientific databases and mobile apps.

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Engaging students in publishing on the internet early in their careers

Presentation given at ACS New Orleans Spring Meeting

As a result of the advent of internet technologies supporting participation on the internet via blogs, wikis and other social networking approaches, chemists now have an opportunity to contribute to the growing chemistry content on the web. As scientists an important skill to develop is the ability to succinctly report in a published format the details of scientific experimentation. The Royal Society of Chemistry provides a number of online systems to share chemistry data, the most well known of these being the ChemSpider database. In parallel the ChemSpider SyntheticPages (CSSP) platform is an online publishing platform for scientists, and especially students, to publish the details of chemical syntheses that they have performed. Using the rich capabilities of internet platforms, including the ability to display interactive spectral data and movies, CSSP is an ideal environment for students to publish their work, especially syntheses that might not support mainstream publication.

 

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Using the ImpactStory API to Integrate Impact Buttons to my CV Display

When I remember, and have a spare moment, I try to keep my publications and presentations list updated on my CV blog page. When the new ImpactStory API was announced I looked at integrating it into the page to display the ImpactStory buttons. It was simple to integrate and I have started working backwards from 2012 pasting in each API call. It allows for calls against PMID, DOIs, GITHUB and URLs. The details are here.

This is what part of the page looks like.

ImpactStory
An example of the API call required to display the buttons is below

<div data-api-key=”WILLIAMSfed86832″ data-id-type=”pmid” data-id=”23159359″ data-show-logo=”false” data-badge-size=”small”></div>

Hovering over the buttons pulls up the stats….

ImpactStory2

My actual ImpactStory collection is here and provides access to the detailed reports also.

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