RSS

Category Archives: AltMetrics

The potential benefits of making yourself visible online as a scientist

The potential benefits of making yourself visible online as a scientist

This is a presentation I gave at MIT to the Boston ACS Young Chemists regarding how they can take advantage of some of the online tools to spread the message about their activities, their interests, get engaged with collaborative science and participate now to gain benefits from the growing world of AltMetrics

 

Big data challenges associated with building a national data repository for chemistry

I gave a presentation at the ICIC 2013 meeting in Vienna focused on the “Big data challenges associated with building a national data repository for chemistry“. The Slideshare presentation is shown below.

At a time when the data explosion has simply been redefined as “Big”, the hurdles associated with building a subject-specific data repository for chemistry are daunting. Combining a multitude of non-standard data formats for chemicals, related properties, reactions, spectra etc., together with the confusion of licensing and embargoing, and providing for data exchange and integration with services and platforms external to the repository, the challenge is significant. This all at a time when semantic technologies are touted as the fundamental technology to enhance integration and discoverability. Funding agencies are demanding change, especially a change towards access to open data to parallel their expectations around Open Access publishing. The Royal Society of Chemistry has been funded by the Engineering and Physical Science Research of the UK to deliver a “chemical database service” for UK scientists. This presentation will provide an overview of the challenges associated with this project and our progress in delivering a chemistry repository capable of handling the complex data types ssociated with chemistry. The benefits of such a repository in terms of providing data to develop prediction models to further enable scientific discovery will be discussed and the potential impact on the future of scientific publishing will also be examined.

 

The Social Profile of a Chemist Online

This is my fifth talk at the ACS Indianapolis Conference:

The Social Profile of a Chemist Online – The Potential Profits of Participation

Unless a scientist is limited by their employer from exposing their scientific activities through publications and presentations, their future impact, whether expected to be at a bench, in front of an instrument or surrounded by robotics, will largely be represented online through their published works, their citation profile and other forms of recognition of their work by their peers. Search engines are already harvesting information about a scientist and aggregating into profiles such as those offered by Google Scholar Citations and Microsoft Academic Search. Rather than be limited to the online representation provided by such services students are encouraged to participate in the creation of their online profile and architect the representation of themselves online to as large a degree as possible to represent themselves to future employers and collaborators. This presentation will give an overview of potential approaches to participating in development of their online persona.

 

 

Personal experiences in participating in the expanding social networks for science

This is the third presentation I gave at the ACS Meeting in Indianapolis:

Personal experiences in participating in the expanding social networks for science

The number of social networking sites available to scientists continues to grow. We are being indexed and exposed on the internet via our publications, presentations and data. We have many ways to contribute, annotate and curate, many of them as part of a growing crowdsourcing network. As one of the founders of the online ChemSpider database I was drawn into the world of social networking to participate in the discussions that were underway regarding our developing resource. As a result of my experiences in blogging, and as a result of developing collaborations and engagement with a large community of scientists, I have become very immersed in the expanding social networks for science. This presentation will provide an overview of the various types of networking and collaborative sites available to scientists and ways that I expose my scientific activities online. Many of these activities will ultimately contribute to the developing measures of me as a scientist as identified in the new world of alternative metrics.

 

The future of scientific information & communication presented at the SUNY Potsdam Academic Festival

This is a LONG presentation….I talk about the “It’s All About Me” attitude that can positively feed science….we want to share OUR science, we want people to know about our opinions, our activities, our collaborators, we want to get funding, recognition and attribution. And why not…it can all be to the benefit of science.

This presentation was given at the SUNY Potsdam Academic Festival

The future of scientific information & communication

Our access to scientific information has changed in ways that were hardly imagined even by the early pioneers of the internet. The immense quantities of data and the array of tools available to search and analyze online content continues to expand while the pace of change does not appear to be slowing. While scientists now have access to the enormous capacities and capability of the internet the vast majority of scientific communication continues to be through peer-reviewed scientific journals. The measure of a scientist’s contribution is primarily represented by their publication profile and the citations to their published works and offers an incomplete view of their activities. However, we are at the beginning of a new revolution where the ability to communicate offers the opportunity to embrace new forms of publishing and where scientific participation and influence will be measured in new ways. This presentation will provide an overview of our new generation of “openness” in which open source, open standards, open access and open data are proliferating. The future of scientific information and communication will be underpinned by these efforts, influenced by increasing participation from the scientific community and facilitated collaboration and ultimately accelerate scientific progress.

 

Tags: , , , ,

Navigating scientific resources using wiki based resources

Presentation given at ACS New Orleans Spring Meeting

There is an overwhelming number of new resources for chemistry that would likely benefit both librarians and students in terms of improving access to data and information. While commercial solutions provided by an institution may be the primary resources there is now an enormous range of online tools, databases, resources, apps for mobile devices and, increasingly, wikis. This presentation will provide an overview of how wiki-based resources for scientists are developing and will introduce a number of developing wikis. These include wikis that are being used to teach chemistry to students as well as to source information about scientists, scientific databases and mobile apps.

 

Engaging students in publishing on the internet early in their careers

Presentation given at ACS New Orleans Spring Meeting

As a result of the advent of internet technologies supporting participation on the internet via blogs, wikis and other social networking approaches, chemists now have an opportunity to contribute to the growing chemistry content on the web. As scientists an important skill to develop is the ability to succinctly report in a published format the details of scientific experimentation. The Royal Society of Chemistry provides a number of online systems to share chemistry data, the most well known of these being the ChemSpider database. In parallel the ChemSpider SyntheticPages (CSSP) platform is an online publishing platform for scientists, and especially students, to publish the details of chemical syntheses that they have performed. Using the rich capabilities of internet platforms, including the ability to display interactive spectral data and movies, CSSP is an ideal environment for students to publish their work, especially syntheses that might not support mainstream publication.

 

 

ChemSpider – disseminating data and enabling an abundance of chemistry platforms

Presentation given at ACS New Orleans Spring Meeting

ChemSpider is one of the chemistry community’s primary public compound databases. Containing tens of millions of chemical compounds and its associated data ChemSpider serves data to many tens of websites and software applications at this point. This presentation will provide an overview of the expanding reach of the ChemSpider platform and the nature of solutions that it helps to enable. We will also discuss some of the future directions for the project that are envisaged and how we intend to continue expanding the impact for the platform.

 

Using the ImpactStory API to Integrate Impact Buttons to my CV Display

When I remember, and have a spare moment, I try to keep my publications and presentations list updated on my CV blog page. When the new ImpactStory API was announced I looked at integrating it into the page to display the ImpactStory buttons. It was simple to integrate and I have started working backwards from 2012 pasting in each API call. It allows for calls against PMID, DOIs, GITHUB and URLs. The details are here.

This is what part of the page looks like.

ImpactStory
An example of the API call required to display the buttons is below

<div data-api-key=”WILLIAMSfed86832″ data-id-type=”pmid” data-id=”23159359″ data-show-logo=”false” data-badge-size=”small”></div>

Hovering over the buttons pulls up the stats….

ImpactStory2

My actual ImpactStory collection is here and provides access to the detailed reports also.

 
 
Stop SOPA