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Category Archives: CINF

The importance of standards for data exchange and interchange on the Royal Society of Chemistry eScience platforms

This is my seventh and LAST talk at the ACS Meeting in Indianapolis:

The importance of standards for data exchange and interchange on the Royal Society of Chemistry eScience platforms

The Royal Society of Chemistry provides access to a number of databases hosting chemicals data, reactions, spectroscopy data and prediction services. These databases and services can be accessed via web services utilizing queries using standard data formats such as InChI and molfiles. Data can then be downloaded in standard structure and spectral formats allowing for reuse and repurposing. The ChemSpider database integrates to a number of projects external to RSC including Open PHACTS that integrates chemical and biological data. This project utilizes semantic web data standards including RDF. This presentation will provide an overview of how structure and spectral data standards have been critical in allowing us to integrate many open source tools, ease of integration to a myriad of services and underpin many of our future developments.

 

Digitizing documents to provide a public spectroscopy database

This is my sixth presentation at the ACS Fall Meeting in Indianapolis:

Digitizing documents to provide a public spectroscopy database

RSC hosts a number of platforms providing free access to chemistry related data. The content includes chemical compounds and associated experimental and predicted data, chemical reactions and, increasingly, spectral data. The ChemSpider database primarily contains electronic spectral data generated at the instrument, converted into standard formats such as JCAMP, then uploaded for the community to access. As a publisher RSC holds a rich source of spectral data within our scientific publications and associated electronic supplementary information. We have undertaken a project to Digitally Enable the RSC Archive (DERA) and as part of this project are converting figures of spectral data into standard spectral data formats for storage in our ChemSpider database. This presentation will report on our progress in the project and some of the challenges we have faced to date.

 

 

 

The Social Profile of a Chemist Online

This is my fifth talk at the ACS Indianapolis Conference:

The Social Profile of a Chemist Online – The Potential Profits of Participation

Unless a scientist is limited by their employer from exposing their scientific activities through publications and presentations, their future impact, whether expected to be at a bench, in front of an instrument or surrounded by robotics, will largely be represented online through their published works, their citation profile and other forms of recognition of their work by their peers. Search engines are already harvesting information about a scientist and aggregating into profiles such as those offered by Google Scholar Citations and Microsoft Academic Search. Rather than be limited to the online representation provided by such services students are encouraged to participate in the creation of their online profile and architect the representation of themselves online to as large a degree as possible to represent themselves to future employers and collaborators. This presentation will give an overview of potential approaches to participating in development of their online persona.

 

 

Personal experiences in participating in the expanding social networks for science

This is the third presentation I gave at the ACS Meeting in Indianapolis:

Personal experiences in participating in the expanding social networks for science

The number of social networking sites available to scientists continues to grow. We are being indexed and exposed on the internet via our publications, presentations and data. We have many ways to contribute, annotate and curate, many of them as part of a growing crowdsourcing network. As one of the founders of the online ChemSpider database I was drawn into the world of social networking to participate in the discussions that were underway regarding our developing resource. As a result of my experiences in blogging, and as a result of developing collaborations and engagement with a large community of scientists, I have become very immersed in the expanding social networks for science. This presentation will provide an overview of the various types of networking and collaborative sites available to scientists and ways that I expose my scientific activities online. Many of these activities will ultimately contribute to the developing measures of me as a scientist as identified in the new world of alternative metrics.

 

Accessing chemical health and safety data online using Royal Society of Chemistry resources

This is the second presentation I gave at the ACS Meeting in Indianapolis

Accessing chemical health and safety data online using Royal Society of Chemistry resources

The internet has opened up access to large amounts of chemistry related data that can be harvested and assembled into rich resources of value to chemists. The Royal Society of Chemistry’s ChemSpider database has assembled an electronic collection of over 28 million chemicals from over 400 data sources and some of the assembled data is certainly of value to those searching for chemical health and safety information. Since ChemSpider is a text and structure searchable database chemists are able to find relevant information using both of their general search approaches. This presentation will provide an overview of the types of chemical health and safety data and information made available via ChemSpider and discuss how the data are sourced, aggregated and validated. We will examine how the data can be made available via mobile devices and examine the issue of data quality and its potential impacts on such a database.

 

 

Navigating scientific resources using wiki based resources

Presentation given at ACS New Orleans Spring Meeting

There is an overwhelming number of new resources for chemistry that would likely benefit both librarians and students in terms of improving access to data and information. While commercial solutions provided by an institution may be the primary resources there is now an enormous range of online tools, databases, resources, apps for mobile devices and, increasingly, wikis. This presentation will provide an overview of how wiki-based resources for scientists are developing and will introduce a number of developing wikis. These include wikis that are being used to teach chemistry to students as well as to source information about scientists, scientific databases and mobile apps.

 

Engaging students in publishing on the internet early in their careers

Presentation given at ACS New Orleans Spring Meeting

As a result of the advent of internet technologies supporting participation on the internet via blogs, wikis and other social networking approaches, chemists now have an opportunity to contribute to the growing chemistry content on the web. As scientists an important skill to develop is the ability to succinctly report in a published format the details of scientific experimentation. The Royal Society of Chemistry provides a number of online systems to share chemistry data, the most well known of these being the ChemSpider database. In parallel the ChemSpider SyntheticPages (CSSP) platform is an online publishing platform for scientists, and especially students, to publish the details of chemical syntheses that they have performed. Using the rich capabilities of internet platforms, including the ability to display interactive spectral data and movies, CSSP is an ideal environment for students to publish their work, especially syntheses that might not support mainstream publication.

 

 

Challenging cajoling and rewarding the community for their contributions to online chemistry

Presentation given at ACS New Orleans Spring Meeting

Chemistry online is represented in various ways including publications, presentations, blog posts, wiki-contributions, data depositions, curations and annotations. Encouraging participation from the community to participate in and comment on the information delivered via these various formats would likely provide for a rich dialog exchange in some cases and improved data quality in others. At the Royal Society of Chemistry we have a number of platforms that are amenable to contribution. This presentation will provide an overview of our experiences in engaging the community to interact with our various forms of content and discuss new approaches we are utilizing to encourage crowdsourced participation.

 

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CINF Session on Public Compound Databases at ACS Meeting in New Orleans

It seems as if we only just finished the ACS Meeting in Philadelphia and it is already time to be planning for your attendance at the ACS Meeting in Spring 2013 in New Orleans. My friend and frequent collaborator Sean Ekins and I will be hosting a symposium regarding “Public Databases Serving the Chemistry Community”. The focus of this symposium will be on what databases are showing up, specifically online of course, to serve the chemistry community. We welcome submissions regarding the underlying data on the databases, the technologies used to deploy them, the algorithms used to query, visualization approaches applied to the content, the challenges of producing the systems etc.

We encourage you to submit a talk to the session where it is likely you will be in very good company! The session is under the CINF Division at “Public Databases Serving the Chemistry Community”.

And as a reminder…if you are going to give a talk in one of the CINF Division sessions it would be great it we could get you to join CINF…it’s very cheap to be an affiliate member.

 
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Posted by on September 14, 2012 in CINF

 
 
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