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Category Archives: Division of Chemical Information

Teaching analytical spectroscopy using online spectroscopic data #ACSsanfran

My first talk of three on August 11th 2014 at the ACS San Francisco meeting

Teaching analytical spectroscopy using online spectroscopic data

The teaching of spectroscopy can be a complex and challenging task. The Royal Society of Chemistry has been developing online resources for a number of years that provide access to analytical data as well as interactive quizzes and challenge sets. The RSC data repository houses over 250,000 spectra at this time including mass spectrometry, NMR and IR data and these are utilized to provide online games to test students capabilities, to underpin the SpectraSchool  training website and to produce source data for students and teachers alike to use in their teaching and self-training efforts. This presentation will provide an overview of RSC resources that can be used to teach spectroscopy using our online data and tools.

 

 

Encouraging students to start publishing early in their career #ACSsanfran

My second talk of three on August 11th 2014 at the ACS Meeting in San Francisco.

Encouraging students to start publishing early in their career

Many students spend enormous amounts of their time engaged with their computers, accepting of course that mobile devices are simply computers of a different form factor. Engaged with the social networks, utilizing computer platforms to source and share content of various forms, their contributions of “data” into what is the cloud, and in many cases a void, is enormous. What community and career benefit might result from those students spending some of their time contributing chemistry related data to the world? What challenges lie in the way of their participation and how might participating have a positive, or negative impact on their future career. The Royal Society of Chemistry hosts a number of chemistry data platforms to which students can actively contribute and for which their participation can be measured. Moreover the RSC’s micropublishing platform allows chemists to learn how to write up their scientific work, obtain review from their peers and chemistry professors in a non-threatening environment and produce an online published work in less than day that is both citable and available as a shared resource for the community. This presentation will demonstrate how to participate and encourage engagement from students early in their education. There are no longer any technology barriers to the sharing of the majority of chemistry related data.

 

 

Applying RSC cheminformatics skills to support the PharmaSea project at #ACSsanfran

This is the first presentation I gave at the ACS meeting in San Francisco on Sunday morning (August 8th) in the CINF Natural Products session.

Applying Royal Society of Chemistry cheminformatics skills to support the PharmaSea project

The collaborative project PharmaSea brings European researchers to some of the deepest, coldest and hottest places on the planet. Scientists from the UK, Belgium, Norway, Spain, Ireland, Germany, Italy, Switzerland and Denmark are working together to collect and screen samples of mud and sediment from huge, previously untapped, oceanic trenches. The large-scale, four-year project is backed by almost 10 million euros of funding and brings together 24 partners from 13 countries from industry, academia and non-profit organisations. The PharmaSea project focuses on biodiscovery research and the development and commercialisation of new bioactive compounds from marine organisms, including deep-sea sponges and bacteria, to evaluate their potential as novel drug leads or ingredients for nutrition or cosmetic applications. The Royal Society of Chemistry is responsible for developing a number of capabilities to support the Pharmasea project including a chemical registration system for new compounds, dereplication technologies to assist in the identification of new compounds and search techniques for mass spectrometrists within the project. This presentation will provide an overview of the project and our progress to contributing chemical information technologies to support the effort.

 

The potential benefits of making yourself visible online as a scientist

The potential benefits of making yourself visible online as a scientist

This is a presentation I gave at MIT to the Boston ACS Young Chemists regarding how they can take advantage of some of the online tools to spread the message about their activities, their interests, get engaged with collaborative science and participate now to gain benefits from the growing world of AltMetrics

 

Accessing Royal Society of Chemistry resources and making chemistry mobile

This is a presentation I gave at the ACS Dallas meeting on March 19th 2014

Accessing Royal Society of Chemistry resources and making chemistry mobile

The ongoing drive towards mobile devices is now simply one of generic ubiquity. It is less an issue of whether a scientist has a mobile device but rather what brand, what generation and what apps do they have installed. Chemistry has fast been moving to mobile devices for a number of years now and today is it possible to draw chemical compounds, perform searches of databases both on device and in the cloud. Modeling of data using server based platforms is increasing in scope and capabilities. The Royal Society of Chemistry was early in recognizing the potential power of mobile platforms in terms to allowing scientists to access data and the benefits of such devices to allowing students access to data and content. This presentation will provide an overview of our efforts to date in supporting chemistry technologies on mobile devices and our recent developments in this domain.

 

 

Data enhancing the Royal Society of Chemistry publication archive

This is a presentation I gave at the ACS Dallas meeting on March 19th 2014

Data enhancing the Royal Society of Chemistry publication archive

The Royal Society of Chemistry has an archive of hundreds of thousands of published articles containing various types of chemistry related data – compounds, reactions, property data, spectral data etc. RSC has a vision of extracting as much of these data as possible and providing access via ChemSpider and its related projects. To this end we have applied a combination of text-mining extraction, image conversion and chemical validation and standardization approaches. The outcome of this project will result in new chemistry related data being added to our chemical and reaction databases and in the ability to more tightly couple web-based versions of the articles with these extracted data. The ability to search across the archive will be enhanced as a result. This presentation will report on our progress in this data extraction project and discuss how we will ultimately use similar approaches in our publishing pipeline to enhance article markup for new publications.

 

 

The UK National Chemical Database Service as an integration of commercial and public chemistry services to support chemists in the United Kingdom

This is a presentation I gave at the ACS National Meeting in Dallas on Wednesday 19th March 2014

The UK National Chemical Database Service – an integration of commercial and public chemistry services to support chemists in the United Kingdom

At a time when the data explosion has simply been redefined as “Big”, the hurdles associated with building a subject-specific data repository for chemistry are daunting. Combining a multitude of non-standard data formats for chemicals, related properties, reactions, spectra etc., together with the confusion of licensing and embargoing, and providing for data exchange and integration with services and platforms external to the repository, the challenge is significant. This all at a time when semantic technologies are touted as the fundamental technology to enhance integration and discoverability. Funding agencies are demanding change, especially a change towards access to open data to parallel their expectations around Open Access publishing. The Royal Society of Chemistry has been funded by the Engineering and Physical Science Research of the UK to deliver a “chemical database service” for UK scientists. This presentation will provide an overview of the challenges associated with this project and our progress in delivering a chemistry repository capable of handling the complex data types associated with chemistry. The benefits of such a repository in terms of providing data to develop prediction models to further enable scientific discovery will be discussed and the potential impact on the future of scientific publishing will also be examined.

 

 

Royal Society of Chemistry Activities to Develop a Data Repository for Chemistry-Specific Data

This is a presentation I have at the ACS Meeting in Dallas, Texas on March 17th 2014

Royal Society of Chemistry Activities to Develop a Data Repository for Chemistry-Specific Data 

In recent years the Royal Society of Chemistry has become known for our development of freely accessible data platforms including ChemSpider, ChemSpider Reactions and our new chemistry data repository. In order to support drug discovery RSC participates in a number of projects including the Open PHACTS semantic web project, the PharmaSea natural products discovery project and the Open Source Drug Discovery project in collaboration with a team in India. Our most recent developments include extending our efforts to support neglected diseases by the provision of high quality datasets resulting from our curation efforts to support modeling, the delivery of enhanced application programming interfaces to allow open source drug discovery teams to both source and deposit data from our chemistry databases and the provision of a micropublishing platform to report on various aspects of work supporting neglected disease drug discovery. This presentation will review our existing efforts and our plans for extended development.

 

Ontology work at the Royal Society of Chemistry #ACSDallas

This is a presentation at I gave at the ACS Spring meeting in Dallas, Texas on March 17th 2014

Ontology work at the Royal Society of Chemistry

We provide an overview of the use we make of ontologies at the Royal Society of Chemistry.  Our engagement with the ontology community began in 2006 with preparations for Project Prospect, which used ChEBI and other Open Biomedical Ontologies to mark up journal articles. Subsequently Project Prospect has evolved into DERA (Digitally Enhancing the RSC Archive) and we have developed further ontologies for text markup, covering analytical methods and name reactions. Most recently we have been contributing to CHEMINF, an open-source cheminformatics ontology, as part of our work on disseminating calculated physicochemical properties of molecules via the Open PHACTS. We show how we represent these properties and how it can serve as a template for disseminating different sorts of chemical information.

 

 

The importance of standards for data exchange and interchange on the Royal Society of Chemistry eScience platforms

This is my seventh and LAST talk at the ACS Meeting in Indianapolis:

The importance of standards for data exchange and interchange on the Royal Society of Chemistry eScience platforms

The Royal Society of Chemistry provides access to a number of databases hosting chemicals data, reactions, spectroscopy data and prediction services. These databases and services can be accessed via web services utilizing queries using standard data formats such as InChI and molfiles. Data can then be downloaded in standard structure and spectral formats allowing for reuse and repurposing. The ChemSpider database integrates to a number of projects external to RSC including Open PHACTS that integrates chemical and biological data. This project utilizes semantic web data standards including RDF. This presentation will provide an overview of how structure and spectral data standards have been critical in allowing us to integrate many open source tools, ease of integration to a myriad of services and underpin many of our future developments.

 
 
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