Archive for category Presentations

Spring ACS Meeting San Francisco, April 2017

The Spring ACS Meeting is coming, and it’s coming quickly. Every time the New Year starts I think I have a long time before I have to assemble posters and write talks for the ACS Meeting. When I worked at the RSC it was easier in some ways as NO ONE reviewed them, no one gave comments on them and there was no clearance process involved. Mostly I was writing the talks on the flight out to the ACS or, more commonly, was writing them the evening before or morning of the presentations. There have been days when I got up in the morning at 4am to write two talks on the day I presented. Quite exhausting but at least I got to show the latest and greatest capabilities.

As an employee at the EPA there are different expectations especially in regards to the clearance process where the presentations are reviewed and signed off, pushed through our internal repository and, post-presentation, released to the community via Science Inventory. Some, not all, of the presentations and papers I have been involved with since joining EPA, are here.

I will be going to the ACS meeting with a number of colleagues and chairing a session on Thursday, all day, with Chris Grulke for the Division of Environmental Chemistry. I will be presenting a number of posters and presentations as listed below. A number of my colleagues will also be presenting. Andrew McEachran, a recent postdoc with the center will be presenting on a lot of the work that has been done in terms of the use of the Chemistry Dashboard to facilitate structure identification. The recent publication “Identifying known unknowns using the US EPA’s CompTox Chemistry Dashboard” (http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00216-016-0139-z) reported on a comparison of the dashboard versus ChemSpider. Since then we have rolled out a lot of new functionality to support structure identification and Andrew will report on that.

PAPER ID: 2624963
PAPER TITLE: Twenty five years in cheminformatics: A career path through a diverse series of roles and responsibilities

DIVISION: Division of Chemical Information
SESSION: Careers in Chemical Information
PRESENTATION FORMAT: Oral
DAY & HALF DAY OF PRESENTATION: Sunday, April, 02, 2017 – AM

PAPER ID: 2616719
PAPER TITLE: Evaluating suspect screening and non-targeted analysis approaches using a collaborative research trial at the US EPA

DIVISION: Division of Analytical Chemistry
SESSION: Analytical Division Poster Session
PRESENTATION FORMAT: Poster
DAY & HALF DAY OF PRESENTATION: Sunday, April, 02, 2017 – EVE

PAPER ID: 2624980
PAPER TITLE: EPA CompTox chemistry dashboard: An online resource for environmental chemists

DIVISION: Division of Chemical Health and Safety
SESSION: Information Flow in Environmental Health & Safety
PRESENTATION FORMAT: Oral
DAY & HALF DAY OF PRESENTATION: Tuesday, April, 04, 2017 – PM
PAPER ID: 2624984
PAPER TITLE: Delivering an informational hub for data at the National Center for Computational Toxicology

DIVISION: Division of Environmental Chemistry
SESSION: Applications of Cheminformatics & Computational Chemistry in Environmental Health
PRESENTATION FORMAT: Poster
DAY & HALF DAY OF PRESENTATION: Wednesday, April, 05, 2017 – EVE

Looking forward to seeing you at ACS!

 

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Social Media Tools for Scientists and Building an Online Profile

This presentation will be given at the Janelia Farm Research Campus, a research campus of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. The presentation abstract is below.

ABSTRACT
Despite the availability of many platforms for scientists to connect and share with their peers in the scientific community the majority do not make use of these tools, despite their promise and potential impact and influence on our careers. We are already being indexed and exposed on the internet via our publications, presentations and data and new “AltMetric scores” are being assigned to scientific publications as measures of popularity and, supposedly, of impact. We now have even more ways to contribute to science, to annotate and curate data, to “publish” in new ways, and many of these activities are as part of a growing crowdsourcing network. This presentation provides an overview of the various types of networking and collaborative sites available to scientists and ways to expose your scientific activities online. It will discuss the new world of AltMetrics that is in an explosive growth curve and will help you understand how to influence and leverage some of these new measures. Participating online, whether it be simply for career advancement or for wider exposure of your research, there are now a series of web applications that can provide a great opportunity to develop a scientific profile within the community.

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Providing Access to a Million NMR Spectra via the web

This presentation was given at the ACS Denver meeting on March 22nd 2015 in a CHED Division symposium

Providing Access to a Million NMR Spectra via the web

Antony Williams, Alexey Pshenichnov, Peter Corbett, Daniel Lowe, Carlos Coba

Access to large scale NMR collections of spectral data can be used for a number of purposes in terms of teaching spectroscopy to students. The data can be used for teaching purposes in lectures, as training data sets for spectral interpretation and structure elucidation, and to underpin educational resources such as the Royal Society of Chemistry’s Learn Chemistry. These resources have been available for a number of years but have been limited to rather small collections of spectral data and specifically only about 3000 spectra. In order to expand the data collection and provide richer resources for the community we have been gathering data from various laboratories and, as part of a research project, we have used text-mining approaches to extract spectral data from articles and patents in the form of textual strings and utilized algorithms to convert the data into spectral representations. While these spectra are reconstructions of text representations of the original spectral data we are investigating their value in terms of utilizing for the purpose of structure identification. This presentation will report on the processes of extracting structure-spectral pairs from text, approaches to performing automated spectral verification and our intention to assemble a spectral collection of a million NMR spectra and make them available online.

 

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Give me kudos for taking responsibility for self-marketing my scientific publications and increase impact

This presentation was given at the ACS Denver meeting on March 22nd 2015 in a CINF Division symposium

Give me kudos for taking responsibility for self-marketing my scientific publications and increase impact.

Antony Williams, Will Russell, Melinda Kenneway and Louise Peck

The authoring of a scientific publication can represent the culmination of many tens if not 100s of hours of data collection and analysis. The authoring and peer-review process itself often represents a major undertaking in terms of assembling the publication and passing through review. Considering the amount of work invested in the production of a scientific article it is therefore quite surprising that authors, post-publication, invest very little effort in communicating the value and potential impact of their article to the community. Social networking has clearly demonstrated the ability to self-market and drive attention. At the same time, the increasing volume of literature (over a million new articles are published every year), requires authors to take on a more direct role in ensuring their work gets read and cited. This requirement may grow with the emergence of a range of metrics at the article level, shifting attention away from where a researcher publishes to the performance of their individual articles. Therefore, a separate platform to facilitate social networking and other discovery tools to communicate the value of published science to the community would be of value. In parallel the possibility to enhance an article by linking to additional information (presentations, videos, blog posts etc) allows for enrichment of the article post-publication, a capability not available via the publishers platform. This presentation will provide a personal overview of the experiences of using the Kudos Platform and how it ultimately benefits my ability to communicate an integrated view of my research to the community.

 

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PITTCON poster: Dealing with the complex challenge of managing diverse analytical chemistry data online

This is a talk I presented at Pittcon on Wednesday March 13th, 2015

Dealing with the complex challenge of managing diverse analytical chemistry data online

The Royal Society of Chemistry provides open access to data associated with tens of millions of chemical compounds. The richness and complexity of the data has continued to expand dramatically and the original vision for providing an integrated hub for structure-centric data has been delivered across the world to hundreds of thousands of users. With an intention of expanding the reach to cover more diverse aspects of chemistry-related data including compounds, reactions and analytical data, to name just a few data-types, we are in the process delivering a Chemistry Data Repository. The data repository will manage the challenges of associated metadata, the various levels of required security (private, shared and public) and exposing the data as appropriate using semantic web technologies. Ultimately this platform will become the host for all chemicals, reactions and analytical data contained within RSC publications and specifically supplementary information. This presentation will report on the challenges of managing “Big Data” for chemists around the world and providing access to tools for structure dereplication, spectral database searching and the crowdsourcing of the worlds’ largest spectral database.

 

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PITTCON Poster: Using an online database of chemical compounds for the purpose of structure identification

This is a poster I presented at Pittcon on Wednesday March 9th, 2015

Using an online database of chemical compounds for the purpose of structure identification

Online databases can be used for the purposes of structure identification. The Royal Society of Chemistry provides access to an online database containing tens of millions of compounds and this has been shown to be a very effective platform for the development of tools for structure identification. Since in many cases an unknown to an investigator is known in the chemical literature or reference database, these “known unknowns” are commonly available now on aggregated internet resources. The identification of these types of compounds in commercial, environmental, forensic, and natural product samples can be identified by searching against these large aggregated databases querying by either elemental composition or monoisotopic mass. Searching by elemental composition is the preferred approach as it is often difficult to determine a unique elemental composition for compounds with molecular weights greater than 600 Da. In these cases, searching by the monoisotopic mass is advantageous. In either case, the search results can be refined by appropriate filtering to identify the compounds. We will report on integrated filtering and search approaches on our aggregated compound database for the purpose of structure identification and review our progress in using the platform for natural product dereplication purposes.

 

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PITTCON Poster: ChemSpider – building an online database of open spectra

This is a poster I presented at Pittcon on Wednesday March 11th, 2015

ChemSpider – building an online database of open spectra

ChemSpider is an online database of over 30 million chemical compounds sourced from over 500 different sources including government laboratories, chemical vendors, public resources and publications. Developed with the intention of building community for chemists ChemSpider allows its users to deposit data including structures, properties, links to external resources and various forms of spectral data. Over the past few years ChemSpider has aggregated almost 20000 high quality NMR and IR spectra and continues to expand as the community deposits additional types of data. The majority of spectral data is licensed as Open Data allowing it to be downloaded and reused in presentations, lesson plans and for teaching purposes. This poster will present our existing technology and our plans to host a million spectra in our developing online data repository.

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A chemistry data repository to serve them all

A presentation that I am giving around UK universities in September/October 2014

A chemistry data repository to serve them all

Over the past five years the Royal Society of Chemistry has become world renowned for its public domain compound database that integrates chemical structures with online resources and available data. ChemSpider regularly serves over 50,000 users per day who are seeking chemistry related data. In parallel we have used ChemSpider and available software services to underpin a number of grant-based projects that we have been involved with: Open PHACTS – a semantic web project integrating chemistry and biology data, PharmaSea – seeking out new natural products from the ocean and the National Chemical Database Service for the United Kingdom. We are presently developing a new architecture that will offer broader scope in terms of the types of chemistry data that can be hosted. This presentation will provide an overview of our Cheminformatics activities at RSC, the development of a new architecture for a data repository that will underpin a global chemistry network, and the challenges ahead, as well as our activities in releasing software and data to the chemistry community.

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Presentations given at the ACS Meeting in San Francisco #ACSsanfran

Recently returned from the ACS meeting in San Francisco it was a busy and very successful conference. We presented to a number of different divisions on a lot of our activities and many of our collaborators presented also. The list of talks is below and as more links become available I will update this page. What I learned is that we need to present in MANY other divisions other than CINF…the attendees of the CHED and ANLY divisions for sure were interested in what we have to say. We will do more of this…

Applying Royal Society of Chemistry cheminformatics skills to support the PharmaSEA project, A.J. Williams. A. Pshenichnov, V. Tkachenko, K. Karapetyan and D. Sharpe, ACS Fall Meeting, San Francisco, August 2014 Link

How the InChI identifier is used to underpin our online chemistry databases at the Royal Society of Chemistry, A.J. Williams, V. Tkachenko and K. Karapetyan, ACS Fall Meeting, San Francisco, August 2014 (Invited Talk) Link

Dealing with the complex challenge of managing diverse chemistry data online, A.J. Williams, A. Pshenichnov, V. Tkachenko and K. Karapetyan, ACS Fall Meeting, San Francisco, August 2014 Link

Encouraging undergraduate students to participate as authors of scientific publications, A.J. Williams, ACS Fall Meeting, San Francisco, August 2014 Link

Who knew I would get here from there: How I became the ChemConnector, A.J. Williams, ACS Fall Meeting, San Francisco, August 2014 (Invited Talk) Link

Open innovation and chemistry data management contributions from the Royal Society of Chemistry resulting from the Open PHACTS project, A.J. Williams. A. Pshenichnov, J. Steele, C. Batchelor, V. Tkachenko, K. Karapetyan and V. Tkachenko, ACS Fall Meeting, San Francisco, August 2014 Link

Using an online database of chemical compounds for the purpose of structure identification, A.J. Williams, A. Pshenichnov and V. Tkachenko, ACS Fall Meeting, San Francisco, August 2014

The Royal Society of Chemistry and its adoption of semantic web technologies for chemistry at the epoch of a federated world, A.J. Williams and V. Tkachenko, ACS Fall Meeting, San Francisco, August 2014 Link

Accessing 3D printable chemical structures online. V. F. Scalfani, A. J. Williams, R. M. Hanson, J. E. Bara, A. Day, V. Tkachenko, ACS Fall Meeting, San Francisco, August 2014 Link

Using the BRAIN, biorelations and intelligence network, for knowledge discovery. A. Mons, B. Mons, A. Krol, A.Baak, A.J. Williams, V. Tkachenko, ACS Fall Meeting, San Francisco, August 2014

Navigating chemistry requirements for data management and electronic notebooks: A case study. L. R. McEwen, A. J. Williams, V. Tkachenko, J. G. Frey, S. J. Coles, A. E. Day, C. Willoughby, W. R. Dichtel, ACS Fall Meeting, San Francisco, August 2014

The Chemical Analysis Metadata Platform (ChAMP): Thoughts and Ideas on the Semantic Identification of Analytical Metrics, S. Chalk,  A.J. Williams, V.Tkachenko San Francisco, August 2014 Link

Integrating Jmol/JSpecView into the Eureka Research Workbench. S. Chalk, M. Morse, I. Hurst, A.J. Williams, V.Tkachenko, A. Pshenichnov, R. Hanson, ACS Fall Meeting, San Francisco, August 2014

Clustering the Royal Society of Chemistry chemical repository to enable enhanced navigation across millions of chemicals. K. Karapetyan, V. Tkachenko, A. J. Williams, O. Kohlbacher, P. Thiel, ACS Fall Meeting, San Francisco, August 2014 Link

Experiences and adventures with noSQL and its applications to cheminformatics data. V. Tkachenko, A.J. Williams, K. Karapetyan, A. Pshenichnov, M. Rybalkin, ACS Fall Meeting, San Francisco, August 2014 Link

Faculty profiling and searching in the Eureka Research Workbench using VIVO and ScientistsDB. S. Chalk, M.Morse, I. Hurst, A.J. Williams, V. Tkachenko, A. Pshenichnov, ACS Fall Meeting, San Francisco, August 2014

Supporting the exploding dimensions of the chemical sciences via global networking. V. Tkachenko, A.J. Williams, S. Vatsadze, ACS Fall Meeting, San Francisco, August 2014 Link

Toward extracting analytical science metrics from the RSC archives. S. Chalk, A.J. Williams, V. Tkachenko, C.Batchelor, ACS Fall Meeting, San Francisco, August 2014

Dereplication applications for computer-assisted structure elucidation (CASE) and the ChemSpider database. P.Wheeler, A. Moser, J. DiMartio, M. Elyashberg, K. Blinov, S. Molodstov, A.J. Williams, ACS Fall Meeting, San Francisco, August 2014 (Invited  talk)

Real structures for real natural products − really getting them right and getting them faster. P. Wheeler, A.J. Williams, M. Elyashberg, R. Pol, A. Moser, ACS Fall Meeting, San Francisco, August 2014

The increasing importance of chemical information literacy in the life of graduate students: Contributions from the ACS Division of Chemical Information (CINF, G. Baysinger, J. Currano, J. Garritano, L. R McEwen, A. J Williams

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Using an online database of chemical compounds for the purpose of structure identification #ACSsanfran

Using an online database of chemical compounds for the purpose of structure identification

Online databases can be used for the purposes of structure identification. The Royal Society of Chemistry provides access to an online database containing tens of millions of compounds and this has been shown to be a very effective platform for the development of tools for structure identification. Since in many cases an unknown to an investigator is known in the chemical literature or reference database, these “known unknowns” are commonly available now on aggregated internet resources. The identification of these types of compounds in commercial, environmental, forensic, and natural product samples can be identified by searching against these large aggregated databases querying by either elemental composition or monoisotopic mass. Searching by elemental composition is the preferred approach as it is often difficult to determine a unique elemental composition for compounds with molecular weights greater than 600 Da. In these cases, searching by the monoisotopic mass is advantageous. In either case, the search results can be refined by appropriate filtering to identify the compounds. We will report on integrated filtering and search approaches on our aggregated compound database for the purpose of structure identification and review our progress in using the platform for natural product dereplication purposes.

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