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Category Archives: Presentations

Beyond the paper CV and developing a scientific profile through social media, altmetrics and micropublication

This is a presentation that I will have delivered twice here in the UK this week…

Beyond the paper CV and developing a scientific profile through social media, altmetrics and micropublication

Many of us nowadays invest significant amounts of time in sharing our activities and opinions with friends and family via social networking tools. However, despite the availability of many platforms for scientists to connect and share with their peers in the scientific community the majority do not make use of these tools, despite their promise and potential impact and influence on our future careers. We are being indexed and exposed on the internet via our publications, presentations and data. We also have many more ways to contribute to science, to annotate and curate data, to “publish” in new ways, and many of these activities are as part of a growing crowdsourcing network. This presentation will provide an overview of the various types of networking and collaborative sites available to scientists and ways to expose your scientific activities online. Many of these can ultimately contribute to the developing measures of you as a scientist as identified in the new world of alternative metrics. Participating offers a great opportunity to develop a scientific profile within the community and may ultimately be very beneficial, especially to scientists early in their career.

 

The UK National Chemical Database Service as an integration of commercial and public chemistry services to support chemists in the United Kingdom

This is a presentation I gave at the ACS National Meeting in Dallas on Wednesday 19th March 2014

The UK National Chemical Database Service – an integration of commercial and public chemistry services to support chemists in the United Kingdom

At a time when the data explosion has simply been redefined as “Big”, the hurdles associated with building a subject-specific data repository for chemistry are daunting. Combining a multitude of non-standard data formats for chemicals, related properties, reactions, spectra etc., together with the confusion of licensing and embargoing, and providing for data exchange and integration with services and platforms external to the repository, the challenge is significant. This all at a time when semantic technologies are touted as the fundamental technology to enhance integration and discoverability. Funding agencies are demanding change, especially a change towards access to open data to parallel their expectations around Open Access publishing. The Royal Society of Chemistry has been funded by the Engineering and Physical Science Research of the UK to deliver a “chemical database service” for UK scientists. This presentation will provide an overview of the challenges associated with this project and our progress in delivering a chemistry repository capable of handling the complex data types associated with chemistry. The benefits of such a repository in terms of providing data to develop prediction models to further enable scientific discovery will be discussed and the potential impact on the future of scientific publishing will also be examined.

 

 

Big data challenges associated with building a national data repository for chemistry

I gave a presentation at the ICIC 2013 meeting in Vienna focused on the “Big data challenges associated with building a national data repository for chemistry“. The Slideshare presentation is shown below.

At a time when the data explosion has simply been redefined as “Big”, the hurdles associated with building a subject-specific data repository for chemistry are daunting. Combining a multitude of non-standard data formats for chemicals, related properties, reactions, spectra etc., together with the confusion of licensing and embargoing, and providing for data exchange and integration with services and platforms external to the repository, the challenge is significant. This all at a time when semantic technologies are touted as the fundamental technology to enhance integration and discoverability. Funding agencies are demanding change, especially a change towards access to open data to parallel their expectations around Open Access publishing. The Royal Society of Chemistry has been funded by the Engineering and Physical Science Research of the UK to deliver a “chemical database service” for UK scientists. This presentation will provide an overview of the challenges associated with this project and our progress in delivering a chemistry repository capable of handling the complex data types ssociated with chemistry. The benefits of such a repository in terms of providing data to develop prediction models to further enable scientific discovery will be discussed and the potential impact on the future of scientific publishing will also be examined.

 

The importance of standards for data exchange and interchange on the Royal Society of Chemistry eScience platforms

This is my seventh and LAST talk at the ACS Meeting in Indianapolis:

The importance of standards for data exchange and interchange on the Royal Society of Chemistry eScience platforms

The Royal Society of Chemistry provides access to a number of databases hosting chemicals data, reactions, spectroscopy data and prediction services. These databases and services can be accessed via web services utilizing queries using standard data formats such as InChI and molfiles. Data can then be downloaded in standard structure and spectral formats allowing for reuse and repurposing. The ChemSpider database integrates to a number of projects external to RSC including Open PHACTS that integrates chemical and biological data. This project utilizes semantic web data standards including RDF. This presentation will provide an overview of how structure and spectral data standards have been critical in allowing us to integrate many open source tools, ease of integration to a myriad of services and underpin many of our future developments.

 

Digitizing documents to provide a public spectroscopy database

This is my sixth presentation at the ACS Fall Meeting in Indianapolis:

Digitizing documents to provide a public spectroscopy database

RSC hosts a number of platforms providing free access to chemistry related data. The content includes chemical compounds and associated experimental and predicted data, chemical reactions and, increasingly, spectral data. The ChemSpider database primarily contains electronic spectral data generated at the instrument, converted into standard formats such as JCAMP, then uploaded for the community to access. As a publisher RSC holds a rich source of spectral data within our scientific publications and associated electronic supplementary information. We have undertaken a project to Digitally Enable the RSC Archive (DERA) and as part of this project are converting figures of spectral data into standard spectral data formats for storage in our ChemSpider database. This presentation will report on our progress in the project and some of the challenges we have faced to date.

 

 

 

The Social Profile of a Chemist Online

This is my fifth talk at the ACS Indianapolis Conference:

The Social Profile of a Chemist Online – The Potential Profits of Participation

Unless a scientist is limited by their employer from exposing their scientific activities through publications and presentations, their future impact, whether expected to be at a bench, in front of an instrument or surrounded by robotics, will largely be represented online through their published works, their citation profile and other forms of recognition of their work by their peers. Search engines are already harvesting information about a scientist and aggregating into profiles such as those offered by Google Scholar Citations and Microsoft Academic Search. Rather than be limited to the online representation provided by such services students are encouraged to participate in the creation of their online profile and architect the representation of themselves online to as large a degree as possible to represent themselves to future employers and collaborators. This presentation will give an overview of potential approaches to participating in development of their online persona.

 

 

Accessing chemical health and safety data online using Royal Society of Chemistry resources

This is the second presentation I gave at the ACS Meeting in Indianapolis

Accessing chemical health and safety data online using Royal Society of Chemistry resources

The internet has opened up access to large amounts of chemistry related data that can be harvested and assembled into rich resources of value to chemists. The Royal Society of Chemistry’s ChemSpider database has assembled an electronic collection of over 28 million chemicals from over 400 data sources and some of the assembled data is certainly of value to those searching for chemical health and safety information. Since ChemSpider is a text and structure searchable database chemists are able to find relevant information using both of their general search approaches. This presentation will provide an overview of the types of chemical health and safety data and information made available via ChemSpider and discuss how the data are sourced, aggregated and validated. We will examine how the data can be made available via mobile devices and examine the issue of data quality and its potential impacts on such a database.

 

 

Apps and approaches to mobilizing chemistry from the Royal Society of Chemistry

This is the first presentation I gave at the ACS Meeting in Indianapolis

Apps and approaches to mobilizing chemistry from the Royal Society of Chemistry

Mobilizing chemistry by delivering data and content from Royal Society of Chemistry resources has become an important component of our activities to increase accessibility. Content includes access to our publications, our magazine content and our chemistry databases. Mobile devices also allow us to deliver access to tools to support teaching, game-based learning, annotation and curation of data. This presentation will provide an overview of our varied activities in enhancing access to chemistry related data and materials. This will include providing data feeds associated with RSC graphical databases, our experiences in optical structure recognition using smartphone apps and our future vision for supporting chemistry on mobile devices.

 

Engaging students in publishing on the internet early in their careers

Presentation given at ACS New Orleans Spring Meeting

As a result of the advent of internet technologies supporting participation on the internet via blogs, wikis and other social networking approaches, chemists now have an opportunity to contribute to the growing chemistry content on the web. As scientists an important skill to develop is the ability to succinctly report in a published format the details of scientific experimentation. The Royal Society of Chemistry provides a number of online systems to share chemistry data, the most well known of these being the ChemSpider database. In parallel the ChemSpider SyntheticPages (CSSP) platform is an online publishing platform for scientists, and especially students, to publish the details of chemical syntheses that they have performed. Using the rich capabilities of internet platforms, including the ability to display interactive spectral data and movies, CSSP is an ideal environment for students to publish their work, especially syntheses that might not support mainstream publication.

 

 

Kitchen Chemistry with my Kids and the fun of the BEMEWS Reaction – THIS WAS AN APRIL 1ST JOKE!!!

This weekend I spent some time with my boys teaching them a little more Kitchen Chemistry. I’ve been doing a whole series of kitchen chemistry experiments but this one was definitely a lot of fun. I got to teach them a little more about magnetism (as I did in this movie: Magnetism in the Human Body: Lessons for Ten Year Olds).

This time I was teaching them all about rare-earth magnets and how they could be used in a solution of Borax and Bemews catalyst to form an extended hydration network and grow blue water balls. Admittedly these hydration spheres centered around the magnetic ions don’t persists for very long but nevertheless the experiment is a fun one for kids!

The BEMEWS reaction using magnetic centered dendritic network growth of hydration spheres

 
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Posted by on March 31, 2013 in Presentations

 
 
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