Posts Tagged NPC Browser

Structure representations in public chemistry databases: The challenges of validating the chemical structures for 200 top-selling drugs

My final presentation at ACS Denver yesterday I think was the clearest presentation I gave all week. As with most presentations I gave last week I was up at 4am to finish it off based on conversations I had been having during the week. A lot of people came to the booth after the presentation to acknowledge that they had been dealing with such challenges for years and that it was time that a drug collection was finally available. It took months to get 152 drugs “right”. It would take a looong time to reproduce something of the quality of Merck Index!

Structure representations in public chemistry databases: The challenges of validating the chemical structures for 200 top-selling drugs

Internet-based public domain databases containing chemical compounds have grown in number, capability and content in recent years. There are now many databases containing millions of chemical compounds associated with different types of data including chemical names, properties, analytical data, and with associated mapping to proteins,  assay data, clinical information and so on. These disparate data sources suffer from one common issue – quality of data. This presentation will provide an overview of our efforts to source the appropriate structural representations for 200 top-selling drugs from public domain sources. This intra- and inter-laboratory comparison of approaches, processes and necessary agreements exposed the challenges associated with aggregating structure-based data. The project also provided data regarding the distribution of quality issues associated with many of the community’s popular databases.”

 

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Encouraging Collaboration in Washington as a Hub for Chemistry Databases

On August 25/26 I will be attending the 5th Meeting on U.S. Government Chemical Databases and Open Chemistry. I will have the opportunity to spend time with people I appreciate for the contributions they are making to chemistry: Martin Walker, JC Bradley, Andy Lang, Markus Sitzmann, Ann Richard, Frank Switzer, Evan Bolton, Marc Zimmermann, Wolf Ihlenfeldt, Steve Heller, John Overington, Noel O’Boyle, and many others. It is surely going to be an excellent meeting. The agenda is given here.

Some of the people listed above are associated with “Washington-based databases”. Databases that are developed in or around Washington by government-funded organizations – the FDA, NIH, NCBI/NLM, NCI, NIST. There are also other government funded databases, non-Washington-based, represented – EPA and CDC. If you are not sure what all those three letter acronyms are then here you go.

FDA – Food and Drug Administration

NIH – National Institutes of Health

NCBI/NLM – National Center for Biotechnology Information/National Library of Medicine

NCI – National Cancer Institute

EPA – Environmental Protection Agency

CDC – Center of Disease Control

NIST – National Institute of Standards and Technology

One organization with a chemistry database conspicuous by its absence is the NCGC data collection contained in the NPC Browser. I’ve blogged a lot about this one on this blog.

NCGC – NIH Chemical Genomics Center

I am hoping to get to talk to some members of the team if they attend the meeting though.

There will be a LOT of government databases represented at this meeting. I have experience with many of the databases provided by these institutions. The DSSTox database is one of the most highly curated databases based on my review of the data. The NCI resolver is an excellent resource with good quality data in terms of the accuracy of name-structure relationships.

The various databases are developed independently of each other. True, some of the databases contain contents from some of the other databases but, as far as I can tell, there is not much collaboration in terms of coordinated curation of data. What would it be like if each of these organizations participated in a roundtable discussion to agree to a process by which to collaboratively validate and curate the data, once and for all? Maybe this meeting can catalyze such a discussion. I would encourage the organizations to take advantage of other data sources that can share their data – ChEBI/ChEMBL is one example! If these various groups coordinate their work then the result could be a massively improved quality dataset to share across the databases and across the community. If this work was done then the group that assembled the NPC Browser would likely have a lot less work to do in terms of assembling the data. The various database providers should certainly have provided clean, curated data for many of the top known drugs. While working on a manuscript reviewing the quality of public domain chemistry databases I assembled a table of 25 of the top selling drugs in the US and checked the data quality in the NPC Browser relative to a gold standard set. The assembly of the data will be discussed in its entirety  in a later publication.

25 of the Top Selling Drugs in the USA - Data Quality in the NPC Browser

The errors listed in the table are:

1 Correct skeleton, No stereochemistry
2 Correct skeleton, Missing stereochemistry
3 Correct skeleton, Incorrect stereochemistry
4 Single component of multicomponent structure
5 Multiple components for single component structure
6 No structure returned based on Name Search
7 Incorrect skeleton
8 Multiple structures based on name search

 

Clearly there are a lot of errors in the structures associated with 25 of the best selling drugs on the US market. These should be the easy ones to get right as they are so well known!!! Collaboration between the domains top database providers would have helped, almost certainly. This would not necessarily be an issue of meshing technologies but agreeing on a common goal to have the highest quality data available. Since the government puts so much money into the development of these databases it would be appropriate to have some oversight and push for aligning efforts. Collaboration is essential!

With that in mind…a shameless pointer to how Sean Ekins, Maggie Hupcey and I BELIEVE in the need for collaboration…our book. If we can encourage others in the government chemistry databases to adopt active collaborative approaches wonderful things could happen.

Collaborative Computational Technologies for Biomedical Research

 

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Searching for “Complete Synonyms” in PubChem and the NPC Browser

I am interested in feedback from online databases as to expected behaviors from a search. PubChem has a Complete Synonym search that limits a chemical name based search to the synonym field. Without that fielded search the search is across all text in a record, I assume. The difference in the results is shown below. The top image shows a search for Taxol and returning 59 results.

A search for Taxol in PubChem

Below is a search on Taxol[completesynonym]. This search returns 5 hits for Taxol.

I wonder whether most users of PubChem know that they need to add the [completesynonym] definition to limit the search? You might want to try Diamond and Diamond[completesynonym] as searches and look at the results.

I am assuming that on the NPC Browser a similar type of search can be conducted to limit results as a search on the drug Lidocaine returns 14 chemicals..all of them different. If this search exists I have missed it. Can anyone comment?

With ChemSpider we do our utmost to return a single structure for a clearly unique name such as Taxol and Lidocaine. We believe that’s what most people would expect. Thoughts and comments welcome.

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Duplicate compounds in the NPC Browser and NCGC Dataset

I am presently working on a couple of articles, book chapters and guest blog posts regarding quality in public domain chemistry databases. In so doing I have continued to work through the data contained within the NPC Browser that I have blogged about many times before. I HAVE been adding curation comments to the data as I have worked through them and have removed inappropriately associated chemical names. Eventually it became too much of a burden relative to me getting my work done as there are so many edits required. What I have been looking for specifically is examples of what I thought would exist in the database – that of a failure to deduplicate. Deduplication, in terms of chemistry databases, is collapsing together records based on the same chemical structure. This sounds easy but it isn’t necessarily so….consider some of the complexities of collapsing tautomers. SIMPLE collapsing can be done by generating InChIKeys and deduplicating but InChI tautomer detection is imperfect and this approach will fail regularly. The majority of the cheminformatics toolkits have their own ways of generating fingerprints to deal with this issue of deduplication.

While browsing the database I came across Ranitidine, the active component of the well known drug Zantac. I found two records in the database. They are shown below and numbered as 1/2 and 2/2.

Ranitidine record 1.

Ranitidine record 2.

I have compared these records as molfiles. I have compared SMILES string (below).

CN\C(NCCSCC1=CC=C(CN(C)C)O1)=C/[N+]([O-])=O
CN\C(NCCSCC1=CC=C(CN(C)C)O1)=C/[N+]([O-])=O

I have compared InChIs

InChI=1S/C13H22N4O3S/c1-14-13(9-17(18)19)15-6-7-21-10-12-5-4-11(20-12)8-16(2)3/h4-5,9,14-15H,6-8,10H2,1-3H3/b13-9+
InChI=1S/C13H22N4O3S/c1-14-13(9-17(18)19)15-6-7-21-10-12-5-4-11(20-12)8-16(2)3/h4-5,9,14-15H,6-8,10H2,1-3H3/b13-9+

VMXUWOKSQNHOCA-UKTHLTGXSA-N
VMXUWOKSQNHOCA-UKTHLTGXSA-N

Try as I might I don’t see a difference between these structures. Why were they not deduplicated? This leads to the question how many more duplicates are in the database and why? I have no idea….just an observation.

 

 

 

 

 

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